skip to primary navigationskip to content

Department of Veterinary Medicine

Cambridge Veterinary School

Studying at Cambridge

 

Dr Anke Hannemann

Dr Anke Hannemann

Postdoctoral Researcher


Biography:

I received my diploma in biochemistry from the University of Leipzig (Germany) in 2001 and obtained a PhD in Molecular Biology from the same university in 2006.

I then joined Dr Peter Flatman at the Centre for Integrative Physiology in Edinburgh as a Postdoc and investigated the regulation of NKCC1 & NKCC2, membrane transporters vital for cells' ion and water homeostasis, and focused on differences in their regulation.

Since joining Dr John Gibson's group in Cambridge as a Postdoc in 2010, I have focused on the pathological changes in the water and ion homeostasis in red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease due to an abnormal regulation of involved membrane transporters.

Subject groups/Research projects

Comparative Pathobiology:

Research Interests

My main research interest is in membrane transport and its role in ion and water homeostasis and cell volume regulation

In the last few years the focus of my research has been on the role of abnormal regulation and activity of key ion transporters in the membrane of red blood cells and its implication on cell volume in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. I am particularly interested in the difference in these process between patients with sickle cell anemia (HbSS genotype) and HbSC disease (HbSC genotype).

Additionally, I am interested in the impact of the pathological altered membrane transport on the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease, thereby altering their ability to traverse the microvasculature.  

In particular, I am looking at the effects of oxidative stress, oxygen tension, Ca2+ and other factors on membrane transport and PS exposure as well as looking to use our growing understanding of these processes to find ways to ameliorate some of the complications of sickle cell disease.

Keywords

  • Ion and water homeostasis
  • Haemoglobinopathy
  • PS exposure
  • (Na) KCl cotransport
  • Sickle cell disease

Collaborators

Key Publications

Hannemann, A., Rees, D. C., Tewari, S., & Gibson, J. S. (2015). Cation Homeostasis in Red Cells From Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Heterologous for HbS and HbC (HbSC Genotype). EBioMedicine, 2(11), 1669-1676.

Rees, D. C., Thein, S. L., Osei, A., Drasar, E., Tewari, S., Hannemann, A., & Gibson, J. S. (2015). The clinical significance of K-Cl cotransport activity in red cells of patients with HbSC disease. Haematologica, 100(5), 595-600. .

Hannemann, A., Cytlak, U. M., Rees, D. C., Tewari, S., & Gibson, J. S. (2014). Effects of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural on the volume and membrane permeability of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease. J Physiol, 592(18), 4039-4049.

Hannemann, A., Cytlak, U. M., Gbotosho, O. T., Rees, D. C., Tewari, S., & Gibson, J. S. (2014). Effects of o-vanillin on K⁺ transport of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease. Blood Cells Mol Dis, 53(1-2), 21-26.

Gbotosho, O. T., Cytlak, U. M., Hannemann, A., Rees, D. C., Tewari, S., & Gibson, J. S. (2014). Inhibitors of second messenger pathways and Ca(2+)-induced exposure of phosphatidylserine in red blood cells of patients with sickle cell disease. Pflugers Arch, 466(7), 1477-1485.

Cytlak, U. M., Hannemann, A., Rees, D. C., & Gibson, J. S. (2013). Identification of the Ca²⁺ entry pathway involved in deoxygenation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease. Pflugers Arch, 465(11), 1651-1660.

Milligan, C., Rees, D. C., Ellory, J. C., Osei, A., Browning, J. A., Hannemann, A., & Gibson, J. S. (2013). A non-electrolyte haemolysis assay for diagnosis and prognosis of sickle cell disease. J Physiol, 591(6), 1463-1474.

Hannemann, A., Weiss, E., Rees, D. C., Dalibalta, S., Ellory, J. C., & Gibson, J. S. (2011). The Properties of Red Blood Cells from Patients Heterozygous for HbS and HbC (HbSC Genotype). Anemia, 2011, 248527.

Hannemann, A., & Flatman, P. W. (2011). Phosphorylation and transport in the Na-K-2Cl cotransporters, NKCC1 and NKCC2A, compared in HEK-293 cells. PLoS One, 6(3), e17992.

Hannemann, A., Christie, J. K., & Flatman, P. W. (2009). Functional expression of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 in mammalian cells fails to confirm the dominant-negative effect of the AF splice variant. J Biol Chem, 284(51), 35348-35358.