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Department of Veterinary Medicine

Cambridge Veterinary School

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Study with us

Our students are passionate about excellence in veterinary medicine but they are also looking for a broader education and the opportunity to learn from inspirational teachers, internationally recognised researchers, and the finest minds of previous generations.

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The Queen's Veterinary School Hospital

The Queen's Veterinary School Hospital is a teaching and a referral hospital whose aims are to provide a comprehensive and demonstrably excellent clinical service across a range of species and disciplines for clients, undergraduate and postgraduate students and the veterinary profession in general.

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Major Funding Award for Prion Group

Congratulations to Dr. Raymond Bujdoso and Dr. Alana Thackray who have been awarded a BBSRC Project Grant for their new prion research project into Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

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Looking to dogs for the answers.

Dogs are 10 times more likely than people to develop osteosarcoma, so focusing on dogs with naturally occurring forms of the cancer could yield vital insight into our understanding of the disease and how it spreads in humans.

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Investigating the zoonotic disease risk of displaced communities

Dorien Braam's PhD investigates whether displacement puts communities at greater risk of zoonotic disease transmission.

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Research

The advancement of knowledge through research is the core ethos of the Department of Veterinary Medicine

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Library

Library & Information

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Access to our site has changed

There is now no direct access from JJ Thompson Avenue. Access is now from Charles Babbage Road.

The 2020 Marjory Stephenson Prize is awarded to Professor Julian Parkhill FRS, from the Dept of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge.

Professor Parkhill is known for his research on bacterial genomes, which he has worked on since the very earliest days of genomics. Initially analysing reference genomes for many important human and animal pathogens, his group moved on to comparative genomics and subsequently large-scale population genomics, as new technologies developed. Read more of this story on https://www.staff.admin.cam.ac.uk/awards/marjory-stephenson-prize

 

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